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Bolivia – Civil Society’s response to hiv

Bolivia – Civil Society’s response to hiv

  • 20th January 2016
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Fear, rejection, discrimination and mistreatment were some of the social reactions that the people with hiv had to face in Bolivia when the epidemic started, said Edgar Valdez, the Director of el Instituto para el Desarrollo Humano (IDH) in Bolivia. The first activity carried out by the IDH was fighting against stigma and discrimination towards people with hiv, expressed Valdez. He also said that there were difficult moments, a lot of people died alone because their families and friends turned their backs on them, but during those years they also witnessed kind gestures from friends, relatives and partners that were there for their loved-ones until the very end. Mr. Valdez highlights that, on one hand, they had to overcome the obstacles put by some political authorities, but on the other hand, they could always count on the support of some other authorities. Different media understood the task the IDH was…
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Peru – Hiv control goals for 2016

Peru – Hiv control goals for 2016

  • 20th January 2016
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The most important announcement related to the 2015’s achievements was Peru's inclusion in the list of the 10 countries that reduced hiv's mortality rate faster between 1990 and 2013, a list that was published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The other 9 countries that are included in this list are Honduras, Jamaica, Cape Verde, Burkina Faso, Thailand, Rwanda, Burundi, India, and Cambodia. For 2016, Peru has set as one of their most important objectives the start of the 90-90-90 goals which aim to achieve that 90% of the people with hiv know their diagnosis, that 90% of them receives antiretroviral treatment and that out of that percentage receiving treatment, 90% has an undetectable viral load. At this very moment, only 50% of the people who have hiv know their diagnosis and consequently, not everybody receives antiretroviral treatment and it is still difficult that the people who…
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Nicaragua – Having hiv and being trans: a true challenge

Nicaragua – Having hiv and being trans: a true challenge

  • 28th December 2015
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Ludwika Vega, a transexual from Nicaragua and one of the founding members of the Asociación Nicaragüense de Transgéneras (ANIT), exposes that being trans in Nicaragua is a difficult situation, but that they are fearless in spite of being victims of discrimination and social, physical and psychological violence. Their own families, the people around them and even the police discriminate and attack them. Regarding the access to health care, Ludwika said that there has been some progress. It is important to emphasize the increase in the number of health care facilities where treatment is provided to people with hiv. And also the criminalization of any act of discrimination carried out by the medical staff or any negative to give proper medical care to transgender, gay or lesbian patients. In spite of this good news, there are still some doctors that give them a religious speech and because of this, some of…
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Dominican Republic – People with hiv without access to hemodialysis

Dominican Republic – People with hiv without access to hemodialysis

  • 28th December 2015
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In Dominican Republic people with kidney failure and hiv are not allow to receive hemodialysis treatment in public health centers. In this regard, at least two specialists in the nephrology field who were consulted said that in order to grant people with hiv access to hemodialysis, it is imperative to have hemodialysis equipment that is only used for the patients with hiv, a special booth only for them and staff to look after them. This refusal to provide health care violates people with hiv's rights and puts the country in reverse taking into consideration the vast progress that has taken place in Latin America and the Caribbean during the past years. It is important to say that this negative to treat them is strictly based on stigma and discrimination because as an epidemiologist who prefers to remain anonymous said, the protocol is the same for all the patients, it is…
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